KnowFASD

After what seems like far too long, KnowFASD is back in operation! To those of you who use the site regularly and have been waiting for its return, thank you for your patience.

If you have never visited the site, please feel free to drop by and check it out! Take a browse through the interactive home page and learn more/find help on the site’s wiki.

Our goal with KnowFASD is to provide a comprehensive site where viewers can learn about the neurobehavioural deficits associated with FASD throughout the lifespan and link to intervention options.

The main homepage of the website is an interactive interface where viewers can scroll through the lifespan of individuals with FASD, with neurobehavioural issues at each developmental stage presented as they may appear in day-to-day life. By clicking on a neurobehavioural issue, viewers are directed to a “wiki” (which works in a similar fashion to Wikipedia) housing information from current research on the neurobehavioural issue at hand. Each wiki page discusses a specific neurobehavioural issue: how it presents, potential causes, and potential consequences. At the bottom of each page, a link is provided to topic-specific intervention options.

Please feel free to visit the site, pass it along, and give us your feedback or suggestions. Check back often as we continue to upload information, links, and resources.

Visit KnowFASD

Image source: http://fasd.alberta.ca/index.aspx

Don’t forget to sign up for this month’s upcoming Alberta FASD Learning Series online session: “What’s New in FASD Research” on May 20, 2015, 9-11 AM MST.

Click here to learn more and to register (registration is free and the sessions are presented online, so you can attend from anywhere!)

You can also check out recordings of previous sessions to see what has been presented in the past.

 

A quick reminder that the “Strongest Families” research study is still recruiting participants.

If you have a child with FASD age 4-12, live in Canada, and would like help with your child’s challenging behaviours, you may be eligible to participate!

Check out the You Tube video above for more information or click here to sign up.

 

Previous posts on this research program:

Strongest Families Research Program- Now Recruiting Participants

Strongest Families Research Program

Image source: http://fasd.alberta.ca/index.aspx

Don’t forget to sign up for this month’s upcoming Alberta FASD Learning Series online session: “A First Nations Community Response to FASD” on April 15, 2015, 9-11 AM MST.

Click here to learn more and to register (registration is free and the sessions are presented online, so you can attend from anywhere!)

You can also check out recordings of previous sessions to see what has been presented in the past.

FASD Intervention:

Great Opportunity for adults with FASD in Edmonton!

Originally posted on Edmonton and area Fetal Alcohol Network Society:

Open Arms Program

View original

 

Our KnowFASD informational site is currently under construction. The main page (knowfasd.ca) is still up and running, so please feel free to explore some of the common presentations of FASD across the lifespan, however, the links to the wiki, which houses further information and intervention options, is currently unavailable.

Our apologies for the inconvenience.We will send out a message when everything is up and running again!

 

FASD Intervention:

Send in your comments by March 25!

Originally posted on FASD Research Project:

Calling All Stakeholders!

FASD and justice is a hot topic at this time for a number of reasons not least of which is how it is being taken up in legislation and legal reform.

Last year, MP Ryan Leef (Yukon) proposed a private member’s bill that would amend the Criminal Code of Canada (see the full proposed text here).

The bill was ultimately withdrawn for a host of reasons and instead the matter was sent to committee for further discussion.

The time is now to send in comments to the standing committee looking at issues about FASD and Law.

A number of expert witnesses will testify on this matter in the coming weeks. However, written comments are also accepted. So, pick up a pen and plan to send in your comments sooner than later!

It has been recommended that (when possible) comments be sent in both English and…

View original 99 more words

Image source: http://fasd.alberta.ca/index.aspx

Don’t forget to sign up for this month’s upcoming Alberta FASD Learning Series online session: “Healing Disordered Attachments” on March 18, 2015, 9-11 AM MST.

Click here to learn more and to register (registration is free and the sessions are presented online, so you can attend from anywhere!)

You can also check out recordings of previous sessions to see what has been presented in the past.

Image source: http://fasd.alberta.ca/current-year.aspx

The “Alberta FASD Learning Series” is back with several upcoming intervention-related talks about FASD!

Not familiar with the FASD Learning Series? The government of Alberta (with support from CASA- Child Adolescent and Family Mental Health) presents monthly online sessions related to various aspects of FASD, presented by experts and stakeholders in the field. The best part? They are free and can be viewed from home! All you have to do is register.

This month’s presentation is “The Office of the Child and Youth Advocate, Enhancing Advocacy Skills and Client Participation” by Melanie McIntosh on February 18, 9-11AM MST.

Other upcoming presentations this year include:

  • March 18, 2015: Healing Disordered Attachments
  • April 15, 2015: A First Nations Community Response to FASD
  • May 20, 2015: What’s New in FASD Research

Click on the image above for more information, to register, or to access previous presentations.

Recently, we posted a survey for caregivers of children with FASD, asking about caregiver stresses and needs. Initially, the survey was only open to caregivers of children under 18. We have received emails from several caregivers of adults with FASD who would like to fill out the survey and, as such, we have extended the age limit!

Caregivers of adults with FASD (and children/youth too!), please feel free to click the link below and fill out the survey!

Survey information:

The University of Alberta and CanFASD need your help! We are conducting a short online survey in order to learn more about the needs and stresses associated with caring for an individual with FASD. It only takes 15-20 minutes and your responses are anonymous.

While existing research shows that caregivers of children with FASD experience a significant amount of stress, there is little published research investigating the specific needs of those caring for individuals with FASD, whether these needs are being met, and the relationship between caregiver needs and stress.

Through research such as this, we have the opportunity to influence practice and policy in order to improve services for caregivers and their children. Please take a moment to read the poster above for more information or go directly to the survey by clicking the link below.

Yes! I would like to complete the survey and contribute to FASD research!

 

Thank you!

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 525 other followers

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 525 other followers