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Edmonton Alberta is now home to a unique housing facility specifically for individuals diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The Hope Terrace Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) program includes access to a case management and 24/hour support team. This facility is owned by Homeward Trust with the Bissell Centre providing internal and external support services for residents.

Internal supports are provided by a case management team that is able to tailor programming and support to the resident. The needs addressed may range from mental health and addiction supports to daily living and financial skills, however, are unique to the individual needs of the resident.

The case management team’s support workers are able to accompany residents to various appointments and commitment and work to establish a sense of community through group outings and in-house cultural supports for indigenous folks.

2011-07-11-19-19hope-terrace

Image source: http://homewardtrust.ca/programs/completed-details.php?id=23

Bissel Centre website for contact & extended information.

Global News Edmonton also covered this story. Click on the link for the news article and footage.

 

Image source: http://lethbridgeherald.com/news/local-news/2015/09/12/women-help-guide-fasd-clients-in-judicial-system/

The Lethbridge Herald recently published an article titled “Women help guide FASD clients in judicial system” highlighting the work of two Lethbridge Regional Police workers (and a therapy dog!) in their efforts to help individuals with FASD navigate the justice system and to help the justice system understand FASD.

Adult FASD Justice Program Co-ordinator Sabrina Hacker and Youth FASD Justice Program Co-ordinator Roberta Smallbones act as advocates for individuals with FASD and as a source of reliable information about FASD for justice professionals. As for the dog: he provides a calming presence, relieving stress and anxiety for clients.

Read the article to learn more about the work being done by these individuals in Lethbridge.

Visit the KnowFASD justice page to learn more about FASD and trouble with the law and to view intervention resources and links.

Great Opportunity for adults with FASD in Edmonton!

Edmonton and area Fetal Alcohol Network Society

Open Arms Program

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Image source: http://lcfasd.com/

 

For the past 6 years, Lakeland Centre for FASD (LCFASD) has hosted summer camps specifically for kids with FASD. We are big fans of the work they do and have posted about their camps several times before. The camp employs FASD educated staff and provides children and teens with a safe environment in which they can  gain social skills and daily living skills while having fun outdoors.

 

Image source: http://www.survivorlakeland.com/

 

 

This year, in order to raise funds to build a new camp, 3 staff from the LCFASD will be participating in a “Survivor” competition in which they must complete challenges and battle the elements. Funds raised will go to the LCFASD summer camp. Survivor Lakeland is hoping to raise a minimum of $20000 for the organization. You can read a recent news article posted by the Cold Lake Sun on the competition and the LCFASD’s involvement or visit the Survivor Lakeland webpage to learn more about the competition and donate to the contestants (FYI Lakeland’s contestants are Tracey Knowlton, Tessa Mark and Tabrina Stenz).

LCFASD is also partnering with rainbarrel.ca to sell rain barrels to homes in the surrounding area in order to raise money. You can read more and order a rain barrel online to help them out.

If you are interested in registering your child for this year’s Lakeland Centre for FASD summer camp, the registration form can be found here.

For more information on Lakeland Centre for FASD’s supports and services, visit their website or send them an email at admin@lcfasd.com

The Government of Alberta’s FASD Learning Series are back for another round.

Each month, professionals in the field discuss a specific topic related to FASD. You can attend the sessions in person, by live webcast, or by video-conference (for stakeholders in Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and Yukon Territory). There are some great topics lined up over the coming months with lots of intervention related material.

This month’s webcast takes place on September 26, 2012, 9-11 AM. The webcast is titled “Evidence-based school-based intervention with students affected by FASD” and highlights an intervention from the Inclusive Learning Outreach Team for children and adolescents in junior and senior high school. Presenters will discuss how “Success Coaches” work with small groups of children to support them and make connections with caregivers, family, and community services. Successful strategies, evaluation data, and sustainability will be examined.

The presenters for this webcast are Colleen McLure (Alberta Education), Sandra Swaffield (Edmonton Public School Board) and Justin Tardiff (Success Coach with Wellness, Resiliency, and Partnership Project (WRaP).

Click on the link above to access registration.

Upcoming Webcasts:

  • September 26, 2012 ~ 9 – 11 am – Evidence-based School-based Intervention with Students affected by FASD
  • October 24, 2012 ~ 9 – 11 am – Working with Women who have Addition Issues
  • November 28, 2012 ~ 9 – 11 am – Treating Co-occurring FASD and Conduct Disorders in Youth
  • December 12, 2012 ~ 9 – 11 am – Developments in FASD Research
  • January 18, 2013 ~ 9 – 11 am – Restorative Justice and its Implications for Community
  • February 20, 2013 – Aboriginal Communities and FASD
  • March 20, 2013 ~ 9 – 11 am – The Edmonton MILE: Results of a one-year pilot project to improve school functioning for children with FASD

A list of upcoming topics and presenters is always available on the Government of Alberta’s FASD Cross-Ministry Committee site.

We will be posting reminders for upcoming sessions each month, so stay tuned!

Click here to access recordings of previous learning series and other webcasts.

School’s finally out- Now to find a way to keep the kids occupied… For a child with FASD, the social and cognitive demands of a regular summer camp might be overwhelming. Within Canada, there are two summer camps dedicated completely to FASD.

Lakeland FASD Summer Camp

With the goal of a positive experience and gaining social skills and daily living skills,  Lakeland Centre for FASD ‘s Summer Camp is available for children and adolescents age 7-17 with an FASD diagnosis. The camp is located at Camp Cooinda on Ethel Lake, 22 km from Cold Lake, Alberta.

Information Brochure
Application Form

Whitecrow Village Live In FASD Education (L.I.F.E) Sessions

L.I.F.E Sessions camp reinforces the concepts of structure, predictability/consistency, and respect through adapted activities for children with team leaders who have FASD themselves. These activities run concurrently with education sessions for adults. Children, families, and Whitecrow Village staff work and learn together to create a sense of community. All ages and family members welcome. Children under 19 must be accompanied by an adult caregiver or legal guardian. Sessions are held in multiple locations in BC, as well as one session in Atlantic Canada late in the summer.

Info
Register for a L.I.F.E Session

FASD Peterborough

 

 

 

 

 

FASD Peterbrough has a one week camp for kids with FASD

Other Camps for Kids with Special Needs

Although many kids with FASD are able to attend regular summer camps, many might need a modified camp experience. If this sounds like a child you know, and you don’t happen to live in an area where you can access the Lakeland Camp or Whitecrow Village, take a look at the links below. We’ve compiled a list of camps across Canada for kids with special needs  (and also a link to special needs camps in the United States).

Special needs camps in*:

Alberta

British Columbia

Manitoba

New Brunswick

Ontario

Prince Edward Island

Quebec

Saskatchewan

United States Special Needs Camps

*Provinces and territories that are not listed did not yield any search results for special needs camps. If you know of a special needs camp we have missed, please post a comment and let us know so we can share.


Alberta’s new premier, Allison Redford, spoke out for FASD on Tuesday. As a former justice minister, Redford understands the need for FASD prevention and intervention support and is treating the issue as a priority. Great to hear!

Read an article from the Edmonton Journal about Redford’s support for FASD services.

Click on the image below to learn about the Government of Alberta’s current FASD 10-Year Strategic Plan (2007-2017)

 

Do you live in the Edmonton, AB area?

Do you have a child between the ages of 4 and 10 with an FASD diagnosis?

 

The University of Alberta is conducting an intervention study for children with FASD. Children who are eligible for the study will be randomly assigned to either a math intervention or a social skills intervention.

Please read the Information Poster to learn more.

Have questions? 

Email labfasd@gmail.com or call (780) 735-7999 ext. 15631 for more information or to see if your child is eligible

The word is out! FASD in the justice system is a hot topic.  The topic seems to have caught the attention of researchers, reporters, and intervention programs, with numerous recent research studies, news articles, and interventions highlighting the issue. The Edmonton Journal published an article about FASD and justice on January 22, revealing one man’s experiences with FASD and the law, which follows a general trend experience by many individuals with FASD. The article discusses the gaps in our system when working with offenders with FASD. Our system punishes criminals with the assumption that offenders will learn from the consequences of their actions. Individuals with FASD often lack the ability to learn from consequence and experience, which causes repeat offences, as is the case with the individual in the article.

The article quotes a number of experts suggesting that we need to find a new way of dealing with individuals with FASD after they commit an offence and an effective way of diverting them from committing an offence in the first place. The problem lies in HOW to divert/correct criminal behaviour within this population. For the man in the article, intervention came in the form of a supportive partner, an understanding neuropsychologist who encouraged healthy practices, and an advocacy program at Edmonton’s Bissell Centre

The Bissell Centre is an agency aimed at eliminating poverty in the community. The centre hosts and number of programs and resources with the goal of self sustainability, community participation, and daily needs being met for their clients.

Read the full article

For some previous posts about FASD and the criminal justice system, check out “FASD Interventions on CBC Radio” and “FASD and Criminal Justice Interventions“.

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