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KnowFASD

After what seems like far too long, KnowFASD is back in operation! To those of you who use the site regularly and have been waiting for its return, thank you for your patience.

If you have never visited the site, please feel free to drop by and check it out! Take a browse through the interactive home page and learn more/find help on the site’s wiki.

Our goal with KnowFASD is to provide a comprehensive site where viewers can learn about the neurobehavioural deficits associated with FASD throughout the lifespan and link to intervention options.

The main homepage of the website is an interactive interface where viewers can scroll through the lifespan of individuals with FASD, with neurobehavioural issues at each developmental stage presented as they may appear in day-to-day life. By clicking on a neurobehavioural issue, viewers are directed to a “wiki” (which works in a similar fashion to Wikipedia) housing information from current research on the neurobehavioural issue at hand. Each wiki page discusses a specific neurobehavioural issue: how it presents, potential causes, and potential consequences. At the bottom of each page, a link is provided to topic-specific intervention options.

Please feel free to visit the site, pass it along, and give us your feedback or suggestions. Check back often as we continue to upload information, links, and resources.

Visit KnowFASD

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Image source: http://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/fasd-school-program-engages-students-with-video-game-1.1877439#.U6hPTmyJdeA.wordpress

In 2012, we posted “A Video Game that Actually Helps” about a video game called “Caribbean Quest” designed for kids with FASD.  The game aims to improve cognitive function and self regulation and has shown promising results thus far.

Caribbean Quest has been used with children on a one-to-one basis with a support coach and in small groups through the University of Victoria and and the University of Alberta. Research will now take place in larger groups at David Livingston School in Winnipeg to determine the efficacy of the game in a classroom setting.

Read/view news about the program through CTV Winnipeg 

Learn more about Caribbean quest through the University of Victoria

*Note: Given that iNAT researchers have been involved with the implementation of the program, we have received several questions regarding distribution of the game for public use. Unfortunately, the game is still in the “research” stages and is not currently available for public use. We will be sure to let you know if it becomes available!

knowfasd

We recently featured our newest project, KnowFASD, in the latest edition of our iNAT newsletter. For those of you who have not yet subscribed to the iNAT newsletter, here is some information about KnowFASD:

Our goal with KnowFASD is to provide a comprehensive site where viewers can learn about the neurobehavioural deficits associated with FASD throughout the lifespan and link to intervention options.

The main homepage of the website is an interactive interface where viewers can scroll through the lifespan of individuals with FASD, with neurobehavioural issues at each developmental stage presented as they may appear in day-to-day life. By clicking on a neurobehavioural issue, viewers are directed to a “wiki” (which works in a similar fashion to Wikipedia) housing information from current research on the neurobehavioural issue at hand. Each wiki page discusses a specific neurobehavioural issue: how it presents, potential causes, and potential consequences. At the bottom of each page, a link is provided to topic-specific intervention options.

Please feel free to visit the site, pass it along, and give us your feedback or suggestions. Check back often as we continue to categorize and upload information.

Visit KnowFASD

Parents: wouldn’t it be nice to say “go play your video games” for a change? Imagine a video game that has been researched and  can actually improve the mental functioning of a child with FASD…

It’s a possibility!

An article printed Monday in the Vancouver Sun and the Edmonton Journal highlights new FASD intervention research from the University of Alberta and the University of Victoria. Children taking part in the intervention play a video game called “Caribbean Quest” where they work on their cognitive and self-regulation skills with an intervention coach. The students in the study have improved and MRI scans have shown changes in the white matter of the brain.

Read the article

Also mentioned in the article is an upcoming FASD resource and educational website (which will be featured on this blog when released) and the Wellness, Resilience, and Partnership project, which involves coaches working in schools with Jr. and Sr. high school kids with FASD to provide academic, emotional, and social supports.

Learn more about Alberta Education’s FASD resources for teachers.

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