You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Behavioural Interventions’ category.

Image source: http://www.crisisprevention.com/Blog/September-2015/FASD

 

CPI, an international organization focusing on safe behaviour management, recently posted an article written by behavioural therapist Chris Arnold. Arnold Describes key issues faced by individuals with FASD and  how to best support these individuals.

It is a great read -worth checking out if you are looking to learn a little bit more about what life is like for a person with FASD and how we can help them with daily struggles.

Arnold covers some key issues faced by individuals with FASD such as anxiety, the invisibility of the disability, the need for ongoing re-learning, and trouble with: structure, sequences, verbal instructions, understanding cause and effect, and understanding abstracts and generalizations. He discusses how we may misunderstand many of these issues and the implications our misunderstanding may have, as well as specific strategies to support people with FASD.

Click here to read the article

KnowFASD

After what seems like far too long, KnowFASD is back in operation! To those of you who use the site regularly and have been waiting for its return, thank you for your patience.

If you have never visited the site, please feel free to drop by and check it out! Take a browse through the interactive home page and learn more/find help on the site’s wiki.

Our goal with KnowFASD is to provide a comprehensive site where viewers can learn about the neurobehavioural deficits associated with FASD throughout the lifespan and link to intervention options.

The main homepage of the website is an interactive interface where viewers can scroll through the lifespan of individuals with FASD, with neurobehavioural issues at each developmental stage presented as they may appear in day-to-day life. By clicking on a neurobehavioural issue, viewers are directed to a “wiki” (which works in a similar fashion to Wikipedia) housing information from current research on the neurobehavioural issue at hand. Each wiki page discusses a specific neurobehavioural issue: how it presents, potential causes, and potential consequences. At the bottom of each page, a link is provided to topic-specific intervention options.

Please feel free to visit the site, pass it along, and give us your feedback or suggestions. Check back often as we continue to upload information, links, and resources.

Visit KnowFASD

 

A quick reminder that the “Strongest Families” research study is still recruiting participants.

If you have a child with FASD age 4-12, live in Canada, and would like help with your child’s challenging behaviours, you may be eligible to participate!

Check out the You Tube video above for more information or click here to sign up.

 

Previous posts on this research program:

Strongest Families Research Program- Now Recruiting Participants

Strongest Families Research Program

Some of you may have read our post “Strongest Families Research Program” in May about an upcoming research study designed to help parents of children with FASD to deal with their child’s challenging behaviours. We promised to let you know when the study began recruiting participants, and that time is now! Parents, keep on reading to get help with parenting your child with FASD.

Sue Kobus, recruitment coordinator of the study, writes:

“Strongest Families has developed programs to help parents with their children’s behaviour problems. Strongest Families Programs are done on-line with weekly telephone calls from a personal Coach. The Coach provides support to families, answers questions and guides parents as they learn skills. Families do not have to travel to a centre to get help.”

Researchers are currently looking for families who have children aged 4-12 years, living in Canada, and have a FASD diagnosis to take part in the study.

To learn more or sign up, visit the website  (the website is being finalized. Please check back in a couple of days if it is not working) or contact the team at: FASDstdy@queensu.ca  1-877-341-8309, Menu #4

You can also click on the pictures below to learn more about the study and find sign up information.

Poster

Poster

Brochure P. 1

Brochure P.1

Brochure P. 2

Brochure P.2

 

knowfasd

We recently featured our newest project, KnowFASD, in the latest edition of our iNAT newsletter. For those of you who have not yet subscribed to the iNAT newsletter, here is some information about KnowFASD:

Our goal with KnowFASD is to provide a comprehensive site where viewers can learn about the neurobehavioural deficits associated with FASD throughout the lifespan and link to intervention options.

The main homepage of the website is an interactive interface where viewers can scroll through the lifespan of individuals with FASD, with neurobehavioural issues at each developmental stage presented as they may appear in day-to-day life. By clicking on a neurobehavioural issue, viewers are directed to a “wiki” (which works in a similar fashion to Wikipedia) housing information from current research on the neurobehavioural issue at hand. Each wiki page discusses a specific neurobehavioural issue: how it presents, potential causes, and potential consequences. At the bottom of each page, a link is provided to topic-specific intervention options.

Please feel free to visit the site, pass it along, and give us your feedback or suggestions. Check back often as we continue to categorize and upload information.

Visit KnowFASD

The Do2Learn website is a fantastic site if you are looking for ways to practice learning at home or if you are looking for resources to pass along to educators, caregivers, service providers, and more!

Although the site is not specific to FASD, the resources target some of the toughest areas for individuals with FASD, such as academics, social skills, behaviour management, communication, and daily living skills. The pages have great ideas for activities in home, community, and classroom settings.

Academics

Difficulties in academic subjects such as reading, spelling, and math are common for individuals with FASD. These difficulties often become worse as the individual gets older, so early intervention is very important. The academics section on the Do2Learn site includes activities to promote the development of many academic skills. Topics include:

  • Fine motor skills
  • Language
  • Visual discrimination
  • Literacy
  • Math
  • Learning Strategies

Go to the academics section

Social Skills

Many aspects of social functioning are difficult for people with FASD. They may have trouble with getting along with others, making and keeping friends, understanding feelings and emotions, and acting appropriately in social situations. Just like academics, social difficulties can become more of a problem as the individual with FASD enters adolescence and adulthood. The social skills section on the website includes many activities to work on social functioning. Topics include:

  • Communication skills
  • Social behaviour
  • Social skills toolbox
  • Emotions colour wheel
  • Social emotional skills

Go to the social skills section

Behaviour management

Individuals with FASD often have behaviour difficulties. Some of these behaviour difficulties may show up as defiance, acting out, temper tantrums, aggression, stealing, etc. It is important to remember that these behaviours are usually not intentional. Negative behaviours often occur secondary to other difficulties, such as environmental stresses, lack of understanding, poor cognitive ability, or unreasonable expectations. The Do2Learn website keeps this in mind with suggestions for:

  • Classroom strategies to promote good behaviour and accommodate students with special needs
  • Resources to help understand and deal with the underlying causes of behaviour
  • Behaviour management strategies

Go to the behaviour management section

For Adolescents and Adults:

There is also a great “jobTIPS” resource for older adolescents and adults looking to get involved in the work force. JobTIPS takes the individual through a user-friendly job-planning process with step by step instructions, tips, and resources. Featured topics include:

  • Determining Interests: The client discovers what their interests and strengths are and what they need to work on (i.e. social skills)
  • Finding a Job: Different ways to look for work
  • Getting a Job: How to navigate the application and interview process
  • Keeping a Job: Keeping up with workplace expectations and how to behave in a work setting
  • Other Job Topics: Such as how to leave employment, legal rights in the workplace, etc.

For our readers:

Is there a resource on the Do2Learn website you have found particularly helpful? Leave a comment and share it here!

What other sites/resources have you found helpful?

References:

Kodituwakku, P. W. (2007) Defining the behavioral phenotype in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: a reviewNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 31, 192-201.

Kodituwakku, P. W. (2009) Neurocognitive profile in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders Developmental Disabilities, 15, 218-224.

Mattson, S. N., Crocker, N., & Nguyen, T. T. (2011). Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: neuropsychological and behavioral features. Neuropsychology Review, 21, 81-101.

McGee, C.L., & Riley, E.P. (2007). Social and behavioral functioning in individuals with prenatal alcohol exposure. International Journal on Disability and Human Development, 6(4), 369-382.

Rasmussen, C. & Wyper, K. (2007). Decision making, executive functioning, and risky behaviours in adolescents with prenatal alcohol exposure. International Journal on Disability and Human Development, 6(4), 405-416.

When dealing with FASD interventions, there are many services and programs to consider. With the diverse range of primary and secondary difficulties faced by those affected by FASD, it makes sense that there are numerous approaches catering to different aspects of the disorder.

Given the numerous approaches to FASD intervention (from academic program modification, to caregiver supports, to drug prescription and developmental therapy and so on), I thought it would be a good place to start by giving readers a “what’s out there” post. What better way to begin a blog about FASD intervention than to post a recent research article that reviews the current empirically tested behavioural interventions for children and adolescents with FASD?

Paley and O’Connor recently published an article in Alcohol Research and Health entitled Behavioral Interventions for Children and Adolescents With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. The authors discuss the behavioural interventions being empirically tested to remediate the issues surrounding FASD, and the challenges faced in developing these interventions along with directions for future research.

To our readers:

Communication is a key aspect of this blog. We would love to hear from you! Please feel free to add a comment or answer one of the questions below!

Some questions for our readers to stimulate discussion

How are you involved with FASD interventions?

Are you a caregiver/service provider? What types of interventions do you currently use and what have you tried in the past?

What types of interventions have you had success with in the past?

What would you like to see more of from our blog? (I.e. news articles, research, current events)

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 778 other followers