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Participants wanted for Canadian FASD Media Coverage Study! Please see the below for study information:

Participants wanted for a group interview study about FASD!
We want to talk to you about your experiences with FASD. In particular, we want to hear your thoughts and feelings about examples of Canadian FASD media coverage, to think about how to more effectively communicate information about FASD. Your perspective will be invaluable in helping us to better understand FASD, and the way it is discussed in the public sphere.
Who can participate?
We want to include key stakeholders, like: 1) adults with FASD; 2) parents of and caregivers for people with FASD; 3) healthcare professionals with experience diagnosing or caring for patients with FASD; and 4) FASD communicators (e.g., journalists, public health officials).
What does the study look like?
This study will involve participation in a 90-minute group interview in English. Each interview will include only one stakeholder group at a time (e.g., only adults with FASD, only parents). You will be compensated for your time.
How can I get involved?
If you feel you match the above criteria, please send an email to: john.aspler@ircm.qc.ca.
We will send you a brief online questionnaire to fill out, as well as the informed consent
document for you to look over when deciding whether or not to participate. Sending us an email does not mean you have agreed to participate, and you can choose to stop at any time.
For more information or if you have any questions, please contact John Aspler at:
john.aspler@ircm.qc.ca, or at (514) 987-5500 (extension 3356).

Study Title: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in the Canadian print news media: A study of media discourse and key stakeholder perspectives
This study is conducted by an interdisciplinary team of bioethicists and scientists:
John Aspler, BSc, Doctoral candidate, Neuroethics Research Unit, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM).
Eric Racine, PhD, Director of the Neuroethics Research Unit, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM), 110 avenue des Pins Ouest, Montréal QC H2W 1R7, Tel.: 514 987-5723, email: eric.racine@ircm.qc.ca.
James Reynolds, PhD, Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queens University.

If you would like to read our previous blog post on FASD and Media Click here!

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CG paper

 

Members of the iNAT (creators of this blog), and collaborators recently published new research about caregiver needs and stress for those caring for individuals with FASD.

Based on an online survey, the research team found that caregivers reported many needs and concerns and high levels of stress, and that those caring for adolescents and adults with FASD tended to report more concerns and needs than those caring for children. Also, those with lower income reported higher levels of stress and more needs and concerns.

Thank you to anyone who came across the survey on this blog and took the time to fill it out. The link below provides free access to the paper until May 26, 2016, where you can read about the study and findings in detail.

Click here to read the paper.

The findings of this paper highlight the importance of adequate supports for individuals with FASD and their families. To learn more about FASD and possible ways to get help, visit the iNAT’s KnowFASD page. check out the wiki feature for support resources on many of the issues surrounding FASD, including caregiver needs.

adultAdolescent

 

Conference agenda and registration now available for the 7th National Biennial Conference on Adolescents and Adults with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)!

Research on FASD tends to focus on childhood, with a relatively small body of literature on the effects of FASD later in life. Given that FASD is a lifelong condition, it is essential that research investigate the effects of these diagnoses throughout the lifespan- including adolescence and adulthood- which is exactly what this conference focuses on! You can even check out a presentation by iNAT members (creators of this blog) about findings from our research on caregiver needs, partnered with the University of Alberta (the presentation is titled “Supporting Adolescents and Adults with FASD: The Impact on Caregivers”).

The conference will take place April 6-9, 2016 in Vancouver, BC.

For more information, check out the links below:

Conference Website

Conference Brochure outlining program/presentations and general information

Register

cogmed

Research participation opportunity for families in Edmonton with children with FASD  or prenatal alcohol exposure age 5-13. Typically developing children are also invited to participate!

The study involves a memory training program aimed at improving your child’s working memory. The program can be completed on your own computer at home. Please click on the image above to learn more.

news

The latest edition of the iNAT FASD Intervention Newsletter is now available!

This season’s newsletter includes a spotlight on an Ontario school with an FASD-specific program, information about Dr. Michelle Stewart, (CanFASD’s Strategic Lead for Justice Interventions), and a sneak peak of findings from our research examining caregiver needs and stress.

You can read a copy of the newsletter here and subscribe to receive future editions.

Image source: http://fasd.alberta.ca/index.aspx

Don’t forget to sign up for this month’s upcoming Alberta FASD Learning Series online session: “What’s New in FASD Research” on May 20, 2015, 9-11 AM MST.

Click here to learn more and to register (registration is free and the sessions are presented online, so you can attend from anywhere!)

You can also check out recordings of previous sessions to see what has been presented in the past.

 

A quick reminder that the “Strongest Families” research study is still recruiting participants.

If you have a child with FASD age 4-12, live in Canada, and would like help with your child’s challenging behaviours, you may be eligible to participate!

Check out the You Tube video above for more information or click here to sign up.

 

Previous posts on this research program:

Strongest Families Research Program- Now Recruiting Participants

Strongest Families Research Program

Recently, we posted a survey for caregivers of children with FASD, asking about caregiver stresses and needs. Initially, the survey was only open to caregivers of children under 18. We have received emails from several caregivers of adults with FASD who would like to fill out the survey and, as such, we have extended the age limit!

Caregivers of adults with FASD (and children/youth too!), please feel free to click the link below and fill out the survey!

Survey information:

The University of Alberta and CanFASD need your help! We are conducting a short online survey in order to learn more about the needs and stresses associated with caring for an individual with FASD. It only takes 15-20 minutes and your responses are anonymous.

While existing research shows that caregivers of children with FASD experience a significant amount of stress, there is little published research investigating the specific needs of those caring for individuals with FASD, whether these needs are being met, and the relationship between caregiver needs and stress.

Through research such as this, we have the opportunity to influence practice and policy in order to improve services for caregivers and their children. Please take a moment to read the poster above for more information or go directly to the survey by clicking the link below.

Yes! I would like to complete the survey and contribute to FASD research!

 

Thank you!

Are you a caregiver of a child/youth with FASD living in Canada? 

If so, the University of Alberta and CanFASD need your help! We are conducting a short online survey in order to learn more about the needs and stresses associated with caring for a child/youth with FASD. It only takes 15-20 minutes and your responses are anonymous.

While existing research shows that caregivers of children with FASD experience a significant amount of stress, there is little published research investigating the specific needs of those caring for children with FASD, whether these needs are being met, and the relationship between caregiver needs and stress.

Through research such as this, we have the opportunity to influence practice and policy in order to improve services for caregivers and their children. Please take a moment to read the poster above for more information or go directly to the survey by clicking the link below.

Yes! I would like to complete the survey and contribute to FASD research!

 

Thank you!

Balance

Gross motor skill (movements using large muscle groups and whole body movement (i.e. walking, balancing, throwing, etc.) is an area of impairment that has been found in numerous FASD research studies.  Recently, Lucas et al. (2014) completed a systematic review of 14 articles examining several areas of gross motor deficit in children with FASD or moderate to heavy prenatal alcohol exposure (a meta analysis was completed with 10 of the 14 articles).

Upon meta-analysis, the authors found that a diagnosis of FASD was associated with gross motor impairment in balance, ball skills, and coordination. Exposure to moderate to heavy  or binge drinking levels of alcohol (without an FASD diagnosis) was not necessarily significantly associated with gross motor impairment, however individual studies did find some gross motor impairment in this group. When the subjects diagnosed with an FASD were combined with the subjects with moderate to heavy  or binge drinking levels of alcohol (without FASD diagnosis), pooled results showed that alcohol exposure was associated with GM impairment.

Based on meta-analysis, the odds of GM impairment are tripled for children with an FASD diagnosis or moderate to heavy binge drinking exposure during pregnancy. Findings of GM impairment were consistent regardless of which assessment tool was used.

You can access this article here. the abstract is available free of charge, however you must be a subscriber or pay a “per article” fee to read the full article.

Paper Reference:

Lucas BR, Latimer, J,  Pinto RZ, Ferreira ML, Doney R, Lau M, Jones T, Dries D, Elliott EJ. Gross Motor Deficits in Children Prenatally Exposed to Alcohol: A Meta-analysis. Pediatrics. 2014;134(1):e192-209

The 14 studies reviewed for this paper were: 

Adnams CM, Kodituwakku PW, Hay A, Molteno CD, Viljoen D, May PA. Patterns of cognitive motor development in children with fetal alcohol syndrome from a community in South Africa. [Erratum appears in Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2001 Aug;25(8):1187] Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001;25(4):557–562

Aronson M, Kyllerman M, Sabel KG, Sandin B, Olegård R. Children of alcoholic mothers. Developmental, perceptual and behavioural characteristics as compared to matched controls. Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985;74(1):27–35

Autti-Rämö I, Granström ML. The effect of intrauterine alcohol exposition in various durations on early cognitive development. Neuropediatrics. 1991;22(4):203–210

Barr HM, Streissguth AP, Darby BL, Sampson PD. Prenatal exposure to alcohol, caffeine, tobacco, and aspirin: Effects on fine and gross motor performance in 4-year-old children. Dev Psychol. 1990;26(3):339–348

Bay B, Støvring H, Wimberley T, et al. Low to moderate alcohol intake during pregnancy and risk of psychomotor deficits. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2012;36(5):807–814

Coles CD, Smith IE, Falek A. Prenatal alcohol exposure and infant behavior: immediate effects and implications for later development. Adv Alcohol Subst Abuse. 1987;6(4):87–104

Davies L, Dunn M, Chersich M, et al. Developmental delay of infants and young children with and without fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa. Afr J Psychiatry (Johannesbg). 2011;14(4):298–305

Jirikowic TL, McCoy SW, Lubetzky-Vilnai A, et al. Sensory control of balance: a comparison of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders to children with typical development. J Popul Ther Clin Pharmacol. 2013;20(3):e212–e228

Kesmodel US, Bay B, Wimberley T, Eriksen HLF, Mortensen EL. Does binge drinking during early pregnancy increase the risk of psychomotor deficits? Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2013;37(7):1204–1212

Kooistra L, Ramage B, Crawford S, et al. Can attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder be differentiated by motor and balance deficits? Hum Mov Sci. 2009;28(4):529–542

Kyllerman M, Aronson M, Sabel KG, Karlberg E, Sandin B, Olegård R. Children of alcoholic mothers. Growth and motor performance compared to matched controls. Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985;74(1):20–26

Roebuck TM, Simmons RW, Mattson SN, Riley EP. Prenatal exposure to alcohol affects the ability to maintain postural balance. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1998;22(1):252–258

Simmons RW, Thomas JD, Levy SS, Riley EP. Motor response programming and movement time in children with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcohol. 2010;44(4):371–378

Smith IE, Coles CD, Lancaster J, Fernhoff PM, Falek A. The effect of volume and duration of prenatal ethanol exposure on neonatal physical and behavioral development. Neurobehav Toxicol Teratol. 1986;8(4):375–381

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